FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions (and Their Answers)

CJSH.name/faq

Frequently asked questions (and their answers)

Could I reprint or redistribute something from this site?
Could you tell me a bit about yourself?
Do you mind if I email you?
How can I navigate this site?
How is this site organized?
There’s a lot of stuff here. Where should I start?
What is the purpose of this website?
What should I do if I find an error?
Why don’t you use HTML5 Boilerplate
Why isn’t my question answered here?

  1. Could I reprint or redistribute something from this site?

    Please contact me and ask. In the past I’ve given fairly generous permission to reprint or redistribute my items, but please do ask.

    One note: For some authors, “May I quote, translate, or reprint such-and-such that you wrote?” is always answered, “Speak to my lawyer.” Which, in practice, seems to always mean, “No.”

    If you request permission to reproduce something you see here, I will never answer, “Speak to my lawyer.” I will try to answer you myself, and I am in a position to give you permission if it seems appropriate to me.

    Special exception: If you want to use the picture from Eloi, Eloi, lema sabachthane? for a church bulletin, you have my permission to do so. (If you are good at manipulating images, I suggest using a shrunken version of the high-resolution version want a slightly higher-resolution.)

    Please also note that high quality reproductions are now available, and possibly the original.

    Back to questions.

  2. Could you tell me a bit about yourself?

    I am an Eastern Orthodox Christian, have degrees in math and theology, have a lot of interests, and have had some pretty interesting experiences (including riding an elephant in Malaysia). I invite you to read the author biography, but most of all to browsewhat there is to read.

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  3. Do you mind if I email you?

    I love to hear from visitors! Please contact me.

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  4. How can I navigate this site?

    There are several ways you can find things in this website. You can choose whatever seems easiest.

    • Search. At the top and bottom of each left hand menu are a search box.
    • Left-hand menu. At the left of each page, between the search boxes, is a menu listing what the sections of this website and the contents of each section. (See the next question if you’re curious about this site’s sections.)
    • Browse descriptions. Clicking on the name of a section in the left hand menu will take you to a browseable index which describes what is in the section. Some are broken into subsections. If you find one thing you like, you might like others nearby.
    • Site map. There is a site map for the site, arranged both alphabetically and by subject.
    • “You might also like…” links. At the end of most of my creations is a set of links to other things you might like. Please explore them.

    Those aren’t the only ways to navigate the site. I try to give you more than one option in finding things. Use whatever seems easiest or most interesting.

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  5. How is this site organized?

    This page is broken into four major sections, not counting the sitemap. The sections are:

    • About, which has the things that would traditionally go into an “About” section: a contact page, the privacy policy, etc.
    • Et Cetera is really an “other creations” collection. It houses artwork, humor, games, open source software, and almost anything else that doesn’t belong in one of the other sections. (It’s by far the most diverse collection, although the writing section is itself very diverse and represents a number of genres.
    • Library, which has almost all of the literature.

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  6. There’s a lot of stuff here. Where should I start?

    The home page might be able to help you. Each time you reload it, the “Today’s starting point“, section will highlight a page that changes every minute. The home page can help you find a specific page in this collection.

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  7. What is the purpose of this website?

    This website was created to share the various things I’ve created. This includes a wide range of things I’ve written, art, games, and computer software. (All of these are meant to have a special sparkle.)

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  8. What should I do if I find an error?

    Please tell me! I’d like to fix the error both for you and for other visitors.

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  9. Why don’t you use HTML5 Boilerplate here?

    I believe in using technology because it advances a human goal and not just because it’s newer. Once upon a time, I knew that XHTML was the wave of the future and I converted my site to XHTML. Now HTML5 Boilerplate is the obvious wave of the future. I like using it, but I’ve learned a lesson: someday we may give HTML5 Boilerplate the same condescending smile by which we now patronize a webpage that validates as XHTML 1.0 Strict.

    If I see a reason to recode this site in HTML5 Boilerplate, a more substantial reason than “HTML5 Boilerplate is in fashion,” I will do so. I have experience with Boilerplate and it is a remarkable achievement, just not one needed to help this site achieve its goals. Right now the website’s human goals are served well by the existing markup, and things like “Make fewer HTTP requests” optimize my pages better with XHTML markup than HTML5 Boilerplate.

    I do, as with my search box, use HTML5 / HTML5 Boilerplate features as needed and as desired. (As HTML5 advocates have said, browsers care surprisingly little about DOCTYPEs.)

    This site is designed to degrade gracefully, and it doesn’t look bad in Internet Explorer 6.

    I have used pure HTML5 Boilerplate for other projects.

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  10. Why isn’t my question answered here?

    If you have a question that isn’t answered here, please contact me with your question. I’d like to answer it, and other people may have the same question—so you’d be helping me build a better FAQ.

    Back to questions.

Contact Jonathan Hayward about Jonathan’s Corner.

About the author

Actually, to Me, It Is a Very Good Day

Books by Christos Jonathan Seth Hayward

An author’s musing memoirs about his work: retrospective reflections, retracings, and retractions

The Administrator Who Cried, “Important!”

Revisited after some time

Someone said that a memo is written, not to inform the reader, but to protect the sender.

There is something wrong when employees receive so much allegedly mandatory reading material that if they were actually to sit down and read it as told, they wouldn’t get other work done. And it is entirely inappropriate to demand that people without significant legal acumen claim to have read and understood a contract. Really, contracts are rightly understood only if you understand the tradition surrounding how they are interpreted. That means that unless (or possibly even if) you are a lawyer (or else a hobbyist who may not legally be licensed to practice but who is fascinated at learning how law works), you don’t understand the contract. This is, incidentally, why there’s the website tosdr.org (“Terms of Service – Didn’t Read“).

That much I still believe. However, I believe there was some nasty pride in expecting the business world to meet what I consider reasonable. The normal way of dealing with things is to not read, or to read just enough. And that is why in my first job with over a quarter inch of daily allegedly mandatory reading, I should just have listened to a colleague gently tell me that I didn’t have to read that.

I’ve worked on humility a little bit since then.

Read it on Kindle for $3!

Once upon a time, there was a new employee, hired fresh out of college by a big company. The first day on the job, he attended a pep rally, filled out paperwork concerning taxes and insurance, and received a two page document that said at the top, “Sexual Harassment Policy: Important. Read Very Carefully!”

So our employee read the sexual harassment policy with utmost care, and signed at the bottom indicating that he had read it. The policy was a remedial course in common sense, although parts of it showed a decided lack of common sense. It was an insult to both his intelligence and his social maturity.

Our employee was slightly puzzled as to why he was expected to read such a document that carefully, but soon pushed doubts out of his mind. He trotted over to his new cubicle, sat down, and began to read the two inch thick manual on core essentials that every employee needs to know. He was still reading core essentials two hours later when his boss came by and said, “Could you take a break from that? I want to introduce you to your new co-workers, and show you around.”

So our employee talked with his boss — a knowledgeable, competent, and understanding woman — and enjoyed meeting his co-workers, trying to learn their names. He didn’t have very much other work yet, so he dutifully read everything that the administrators sent him — even the ones that didn’t say “Important — please read” at the top. He read about ISO 9001 certification, continual changes and updates to company policy, new technologies that the company was adopting, employee discounts, customer success stories, and other oddments totalling to at least a quarter inch of paper each day, not counting e-mails.

His boss saw that he worked well, and began to assign more difficult tasks appropriate to his talent. He took on this new workload while continuing to read everything the administration told him to read, and worked longer and longer days.

One day, a veteran came and put a hand on his shoulder, saying, “Kid, just between the two of us, you don’t have to read every piece of paper that says ‘Important’ at the top. None of us read all that.”

And so our friend began to glance at the first pages of long memos, to see if they said anything helpful for him to know, and found that most of them did not. Some time after that, he realized that his boss or one of his co-workers would explicitly tell him if there was a memo that said something he needed to know. The employee found his workload reduced to slightly less than fifty hours per week. He was productive and happy.

One day, a memo came. It said at the top, “Important: Please Read.” A little more than halfway through, on page twenty-seven, there was a description of a new law that had been passed, and how it required several jobs (including his own) to be done in a slightly different manner. Unfortunately, our friend’s boss was in bed with a bad stomach flu, and so she wasn’t able to tell him he needed to read the memo. So he continued doing his job as usual.

A year later, the company found itself the defendant in a forty million dollar lawsuit, and traced the negligence to the action of one single employee — our friend. He was fired, and made the central villain in the storm of bad publicity.

But he definitely was in the wrong, and deserved what was coming to him. The administration very clearly explained the liability and his responsibility, in a memo very clearly labelled “Important”. And he didn’t even read the memo. It’s his fault, right?

No.

Every communication that is sent to a person constitutes an implicit claim of, “This concerns you and is worth your attention.” If experience tells other people that we lie again and again when we say this, then what right do we have to be believed when we really do have something important to say?

I retold the story of the boy who cried wolf as the story of the administrator who cried important, because administrators are among the worst offenders, along with lawyers, spammers, and perhaps people who pass along e-mail forwards. Among the stack of paper I was expected to sign when I moved in to my apartment was a statement that I had tested my smoke detector. The apartment staff was surprised that I wanted to test my smoke detector before signing my name to that statement. When an authority figure is surprised when a person reads a statement carefully and doesn’t want to sign a claim that all involved know to be false, it’s a bad sign.

There is communication that concerns the person it’s directed to, but says too much — for example, most of the legal contracts I’ve seen. The tiny print used to print many of those contracts constitutes an implicit acknowledment that the signer is not expected to read it: they don’t even use the additional sheets of paper necessary to print text at a size that a person who only has 20/20 vision can easily read. There is also communication that is broadcast to many people who have no interest in it. To that communication, I would propose the following rule: Do not, without exceptionally good reason, broadcast a communication that concerns only a minority of its recipients. It’s OK every now and then to announce that the blue Toyota with license place ABC 123 has its lights on. It’s not OK to have a regular announcement that broadcasts anything that is approved as having interest to some of the recipients.

My church, which I am in general very happy with, has succumbed to vice by adding a section to the worship liturgy called “Announcements”, where someone reads a list of events and such just before the end of the service, and completely dispels the moment that has been filling the sanctuary up until the announcements start. They don’t do this with other things — the offering is announced by music (usually good music) that contributes to the reverent atmosphere of the service. But when the service is drawing to a close, the worshipful atmosphere is disrupted by announcements which I at least almost never find useful. If the same list were printed on a sheet of paper, I could read it after the service, in less time, with greater comprehension, with zero disruption to the moment that every other part of the service tries so carefully to build — and I could skip over any announcements that begin “For Married Couples:” or “Attention Junior High and High Schoolers!” The only advantage I can see to the present practice, from the church leadership’s perspective, is that many people will not read the announcements at all if they have a choice about it — and maybe, just maybe, there’s a lesson in that.

As well as pointing out examples of a rampant problem in communication, where an administrator cries “Important!” over many things that are not worth reading, and then wonders why people don’t believe him when he cries “Important!” about something which isimportant, I would like to suggest an alternative for communities that have access to the internet. A web server could use a form to let people select areas of concern and interest, and announcements submitted would be categorized, optionally cleared with a moderator, and sent only to those people who are interested in them. Another desirable feature might let end receivers select how much announcement information they can receive in a day — providing a discernible incentive to the senders to minimize trivial communication. In a sense, this is what happens already — intercom litanies of announcements ignored by school students in a classroom, employees carrying memos straight from their mailboxes to the recycle bins — but in this case, administrators receive clear incentive and choice to conserve bandwidth and only send stuff that is genuinely important.

While I’m giving my Utopian dreams, I’d like to comment that at least some of this functionality is already supported by the infrastructure developed by UseNet. Probably there are refinements that can be implemented in a web interface — all announcements for one topic shown from a single web page, since they shouldn’t be nearly as long as a normal UseNet post arguing some obscure detail in an ongoing discussion. Perhaps other and better can be done — I am suggesting “Here’s something better than the status quo,” not “Here’s something so perfect that there’s no room for improvement.”

In one UseNet newsgroup, an exchange occurred that broadcasters of announcements would be well-advised to keep in mind. One person said, “I’m trying to decide whether to give the UseNet Bore of the Year Award to [name] or [name]. The winner will receive, as his prize, a copy of all of their postings, minutely inscribed, and rolled up inside a two foot poster tube.”

Someone else posted a reply asking, “Length or diameter?”

To those of you who broadcast to people whom you are able to address because of your position and not because they have chosen to receive your broadcasts, I have the following to say: In each communication you send, you are deciding the basis by which people will decide if future communications are worth paying attention to, or just unwanted noise. If your noise deafens their ears, you have no right to complain that the few truly important things you have to tell them fall on deaf ears. Only you can prevent spam!